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UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN -STOUT - MENOMONIE, WISCONSIN 54751 



SPRING 



1983 







Designing A New Student Center 



Stout to build new student center 



Few, if any, new student centers are being erected 
these days at other colleges and universities around the 
country. But thanks to some clearly identified needs and 
a stable enrollment, Stout will begin construction this 
summer of a new $7.1 million center, which will replace 
a facility built for less than half the size of the current 
student body. 

Robert Johnson, director of Stout's Student Center, 
said he was unaware of any other new student centers 
that are being built. "There aren't a lot of new unions 
going up," he said. "We're one of the few new centers." 

But the new Center at Stout has been a long time 
coming. The present facility was built in 1959 when 
enrollment was about 1,300. An addition was com- 
pleted in 1965 when there were fewer than 2,900 stu- 
dents at Stout. Enrollment today is more than 7,500. 
"Since the last addition (to the Student Center), there 
have been more than 20 new buildings added to the 
campus," Johnson said. Lack of facilities, both at the 
Center and elsewhere on campus, has limited activity 
programming, according to Johnson. "Were limited in the 
number and types of programming we can do," he said. 

A major factor in construction of the new building has 
been a stable enrollment at Stout, which has a direct 
effect on construction and operation of the facility. "Our 
enrollment has remained stable," Johnson said. "That 
puts us in a good financial situation. That's what makes 
it (the new Center) possible." Johnson explained that 
student centers are entirely self-supporting, which means 
there are no tax dollars involved in construction or in 
operation. "Student centers are funded by student fees 
and. user charges for services rendered such as Food 
Service, the Book Store and the Recreation Center," 
Johnson said. "That's why there is a direct relationship 
with the financial operation of the Center and en- 
rollment." 

The new two-story, 80,000-square-foot Center will be 
located in a mall area between Third and Fourth streets, 
immediately south of the new library. Part of the site 
is now occupied by the Modulux building, a temporary 
structure which will be removed. Architect for the 
project is the Hallbeck Group of Eau Claire. 

Johnson said the building will "definitely not be 
institutional" in its appearance. It will have a brick 
exterior with a metal-pitched roof. Departure from the 
traditional flat roof is not only for appearances sake but 
also to reduce maintenance problems. Through grading 
and landscaping, the building can be entered at both 



levels without climbing stairs, meaning it will be ac- 
cessible to people in wheelchairs. 

"The building is being placed where it is to be most 
convenient for the campus to use; to act as the hub of 
the campus," Johnson said. "The building is almost 
literally placed over existing pathways. By doing this, 
the traffic flow dictated the shape of the buiding." 

Johnson said there will be no back door to the building. 
"Every entrance is a main entrance," he said. "The load- 
ing dock and garbage area is hidden inside the building 
with an overhead door." 

Inside the building, the lower level will have a "mini- 
concourse" off of which will be the Recreation Center. 
It will feature bowling alleys, billiard tables and outdoor 
equipment rental. "There will be a Food Service facility 
off the miniconcourse, the smaller of two in the building," 
Johnson said. The food facility will have an adjacent 
patio. Service will be geared to selling coffee and light 
lunches. The University Book Store, meeting rooms, 
student government offices, the student newspaper 
office and a television viewing area will also be off the 
miniconcourse, which will be open to the upper level 
and a skylight above. 

Housed in the building's upper level will be the main 
dining area, which will seat more than 500. Johnson 
said this area will have food stations for specific types 
of items. This will include a delicatessen, bakery, fast- 
foods, salad, pizza and Mexican food, and the traditional 
hot food. A smaller dining room, staffed by waiters, will 
be a replica of a dining room in the old President's 
House, which was torn down several years ago. Paneling, 
chandeliers, woodwork, stained-glass windows and a 
fireplace that were salvaged from the structure will be 
incorporated into the new dining room. Also on the 
upper level will be a 5,300-square-foot conference room, 
dividable into three smaller rooms, and a 7,000-square- 
foot multipurpose room, which can be divided by four. 
The latter will have a 24- by 50-foot stage. 

Bids for the new building are expected to be opened 
in July and construction should begin in August. 
Scheduled completion date is May 1985. 

Johnson said the Center involves a number of years 
of planning. Originally, an addition to the present 
Student Center had been considered, but that proposal 
was abandoned when it was determined that it was not 
feasible to add on to the facility. Johnson said he and 
the Center staff are "very pleased" with the project. "It's 
going to be a real asset to the University," he said. 




Placement record remains strong 



A 10-year placement average of better than 90 percent 
for Stout graduates is continuing, despite the nation's 
sagging economy. In the University's annual placement 
report, which covers the largest graduating class in 
Stout's history, overall placement is 90 percent, down 
three points from the previous year. 

The recently released report includes the three 
graduating classes in the 1981-82 academic year. Accord- 
ing to Robert Dahlke, Career Planning and Placement 
director at Stout, of those reported employed, 88 percent 
were working in fields directly related to their majors 
at Stout. 

Samuel Wood, assistant chancellor for Student 
Services, said the report marks a decade of "excellent 
placement success" for Stout graduates. "Since the fall 
of 1972, graduates have experienced a 90-96 percent 
placement figure," Wood said in a written introduction 
to the placement report. "This past year's class was no 
exception, The high placement of graduates from Stout 
for many years is consistent with its mission, namely to 
prepare students for professional careers." 

Dahlke said the report also shows that students are 
averaging starting salaries that are higher than those in 
the previous year. "Salaries in nearly every program 
are up," Dahlke said. "I expected with reduced employ- 
ment nationally, you would see a stabilization in salaries. 
The salary picture here would indicate the opposite." 



Highest starting salaries went to applied mathematics 
majors, who averaged $22,600. Graduates of the in- 
dustrial technology program, Stout's largest major, began 
at an average of $20,200. 

Dahlke said that there has also been an increase in 
the number of recruiters visiting the campus. "Lots of 
large companies cut their campus recruitment, but kept 
their Stout schedule," Dahlke said. "This came at a 
time when interviewing was down on most campuses 
across the nation." The report shows a 13-percent in- 
crease in the number of employers visiting Stout com- 
pared with the previous year. 

Dahlke said that while students had to work harder 
this year in finding jobs, they were assisted by their 
specialized majors at Stout, which prepare people for 
work through a combination of theoretical and so-called 
"practical" education. Dahlke said this combination of 
education is particularly attractive to industry, since 
many Stout graduates require no additional training 
before beginning work. "In this economy, that's a sav- 
ings to companies, since they don't have to spend money 
for training," he said. 

Dahlke said that he has reason to believe that placement 
for the next graduating class in May will also be rela- 
tively strong. "We're optimistic for the spring semester," 
he said. "The recruitment calendar is filling up." 







TEN - YEAR PLACEMENT RECORD 
(Bachelor Degrees only) 






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YEAR 



Bringing industry into the classroom 



Business executives and managers are going back to 
school at Stout— not as students, but as professors. 

Under a new program titled "Business and Industrial 
Professorships," personnel from major posts in industry 
are giving their time to help keep current the University's 
career-oriented majors. 

Participants may be working in industry now or 
recently retired. While the program is intended to be 
flexible, "Business and Industrial Professors" usually 
spend about one day a week on campus, performing a 
variety of duties ranging from lecturing classes to 
developing curriculum. 

"They are doing the kind of things professors do, 
which is service, research and instruction," said Vice 
Chancellor Wesley Face. 

Face said the program is the outgrowth of a long- 
standing practice at Stout in which business people 
have been used as lecturers and consultants. "Stout has 
used people from business and industry on a part-time 
basis for years," Face said. "This is an extension of this." 

Face said a primary benefit of the program is to 
encourage closer cooperation between industry and 
higher education, a relationship he says has been largely 
"a one-way street" in favor of universities. "For years, 
we've heard about the need for industrial and educational 
relations, but to a large extent its been how industry 
can give things to education," he said. "This is a 



genuinely different concept to share the expertise of 
industry with students and at the same time, using 
university facilities to serve industry." 

Dave Brenholt, one of. Stout's industrial professors, 
agrees. "Obviously, there is a need for productivity," he 
said. "I think we should always be aware of looking 
for new ways that we can mutually benefit from in a 
relationship with the University through industry, to 
develop stronger ties between the academic environment 
and the business world." 

Brenholt is manager of support technologies at the 
CORAD Division of Donaldson Corp. He takes time to 
meet with students and staff, both on campus and at 
the lab he runs near the University. 

Brenholt said he enjoys participating in the program. 
"What is nice about this is you have the best of 
environments," he said. "You have the industrial re- 
sponsibility and everything that goes with that. But you 
also have the educational environment and it's a good 
blend of experiences. You have the opportunity to work 
with young people and their fresh ideas and with staff 
that are very qualified in their areas, and they get an 
opportunity to see the real world of industry. It re- 
inforces their educational process." 

Some industries may support the "industrial professor- 
ship program" by providing money for travel, supplies 
and clerical assistance. But those involved in the project 





'A 



v. i mi 

Johnson (left) and Face 




feel that the key to its success will be recruiting addi- 
tional executives for the professorship posts. 

"If people aren't involved, money doesn't mean any- 
thing," said Jim Johnson, a retired executive scientist 
and laboratory director who worked for 23 years at 3M 
Co. "Connecting people together is very important. We 
talk about connecting the University and industry but 
what were really talking about is connecting people." 
Johnson explained that it is through this kind of relation- 
ship that industry and education will begin to under- 
stand each other's needs. "You read articles about in- 
dustry either complaining or making comments on the 
quality and the kinds and numbers of certain graduates 
from universities that they are going to hire," he said. 
"But this is always after the fact. I believe that industry 
people need to get much more involved with the 
universities. After all, the product of the University is 
what industry is going to hire." But he also said that 
at least some industries may have been "somewhat 
oblivious to what's going on" in higher education. 

Johnson's words are echoed by John Pearson, a 
colleague at 3M, who recently retired after 43 years of 



service. "The value to industry and the University has 
got to be that there is a greater appreciation of the 
needs of industry on the part of the University," he said. 
"Changes are occurring so rapidly, the University needs 
some kind of awareness of what's happening, perhaps 
more than they can get from the fairly restricted travel 
they are able to do." Pearson, who was vice president 
for development at 3M, said he has found Stout to be 
an "excellent" place to promote this kind of under- 
standing. "I mentioned to my wife the open and eager 
attitude on the part of faculty to learn more and get 
closer to industry," he said. "That's been real refreshing." 

Pearson sees improved University and industrial rela- 
tions as a survival technique for both groups. "During 
a period when the educational institutions are being 
pressured economically and this rapid evolution in the 
technical areas, you are going to have to join forces to 
be successful," he said. "I would hope that many in- 
dustries would look at it this way and I know a number 
of them do." 

Organizations interested in the program should write 
to the Chancellor's office at Stout. 



Grant aids cooperative education 



Stout has been awarded a federal grant to set up a 
cooperative education program with business and 
indusln. 

The grant, expected to total $350,000 over a five- 
vear period, is funded through the U.S. Department 
of Education under Tillc VII 1 legislation. 

Dorothy Dale, director of the project, explained 
that cooperative education is a method of instruc- 
tion in which .students earn academic credit while 
working in jobs with business and industry. 

Dale called the approach to education a "multiple 
experience.'' She explained that through the pro- 
gram, the students may go out in their junior year 
to work for a particular company and then return 
to that company during their senior year for more 
advanced job responsibilities. "But the jobs, in all 
oases, ha\e to be related to the students' career 
goals," Dale said. "That is a very essential part of 
cooperative education." 

Dale said the program will be housed in Stout's 
School of Industry and Technology and coordinated 
through the University's Career Planning and 
Placement office. In its first year of operation, the 
program will be implemented in the School of In- 
dustry and Technology with majors such as busi- 
ness administration and industrial technology. In 
its second year of operation, the School of Home 
Economics will be added, along with majors such 
as hotel and restaurant management and fashion 
merchandising. Then, in the third year of operation, 
the School of Liberal Studies will begin participa- 
tion with its applied mathematics major. 

Dale said the final two years of the grant will be 
used to expand and further develop the program. 
"We do expect that by the time the grant funding 
is over that it (cooperative education) will be 
a completely integrated program within the 
IniversiU," .she said. 

About 30-40 students will be involved initially in 
the program and at the end of the fifth year there 



should be approximately 300-350 placements, ac- 
cording to Dale. She also said that about 1,000 
companies will be involved. "We'll be looking for 
job sites all over the country," she said. "One of 
the advantages of co-op is that a student is on 
campus for a period of time and then goes off 
campus to work for a period of time," she said. 
"So we could place students almost any place in 
the I'ounln ." 

Dale said the program will benelil both .students 
and industry. It will enable students to explore 
career options and to land jobs after graduation. 
"I (hink the lienelit lor students is by the time they 
graduate, not only will they have a baccalaureate 
degree but they will have up to 12 months work 
experience," she said. "In tin's era of tight jobs, 
that will help people land those jobs. Also, they 
oftentimes will end up in the work place where 
they did their cooperative education." 

She said this means that employers will have a 
built-in recruitment program. "The advantage for 
employers is that they are able to develop a pretty 
fine-lnncd reel uilmeiif program" she said. "The\ 
have these students in their employ for eight to 
twelve months. That potential worker is already 
trained within the company structure. By the time 
the student graduates, the employer has developed 
a finely-tuned worker. Often, it means the person 
stays on as a permanent employee." 

Dale said she also expects the program to be 
extremely henelicial to the University. "This will 
make our already good majors even better and 
more attractive to our own students," she said. 
"It will help pay their way through school, but it's 
also a good motivator for students." 

She belie\es it will encourage faculty invohc- 
ment with business and industry. "Jt also lias the 
potential of bringing industry back into the class- 
room," she .said. 



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Phillips sampling new product 

What may be the nation's first college-level course in 
fast-food restaurants is being offered to Stout students. 

Cheryl Boric, who teaches the three-credit course titled 
"Fast-Food Operations," said that this aspect of the 
restaurant industry may have had a bad name. But Boric 
said that if this is true, the reputation is undeserved. 

"I think that many universities felt that maybe fast- 
food was beneath their level of instruction," said Thomas 
Phillips, who taught the course first semester. He 
attributes this notion to the belief that fast-food opera- 
tions offer poor nutrition and that managers of such 
facilities usually come up through the ranks, with, little 
formal education. 

"As a dietitian, I felt that fast-foods were not nutri- 
tional, Bork said. "This is not true. Fast-foods have 
always been nutritional." Bork and Phillips said that 
some fast-foods may be high in fat, sugar and salt but 
the food itself has provided daily dietary requirements. 
As part of their assignment, students in the course are 
encouraged to develop menus that reduce fat, sugar 
and sodium while increasing fiber content, The students 
are also required to plan lunches that meet one-third 
of a person's daily nutritional requirements. 

The lunches are served to the public four days a week 
from a yet unnamed fast-food restaurant, located in' 
Stout's Home Economics building, In addition to pre- 
paring and serving the food, the 25 members of the 
class also work with other aspects of the restaurant in- 
dustry such as layout, design and energy management. 

Students are also encouraged to experiment with new 
products. Some of the items they have developed so far 
include a Chinese meal, a fast-food approach to the 
Beuben sandwich, and an egg and zucchini product. 
But Phillips said it is sometimes a struggle to have 
students develop products that are outside the typical 
mode of fast-food operations. "I guess it has to do with 
age," he said. "They (the students) are just young 18- 



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Bork speeding service 

or 19-year-olds, They are going to come up with ideas 
based on their experience. For example, a student 
approached me and said 'I have a good idea: a double 
cheeseburger.' Another student said 'I think I'm going 
to do a pizza.' That kind of thing is normal." 

The new course was developed at the suggestion of 
J. Anthony Samenfink, dean of the School of Home 
Economics, where students have been studying other 
aspects of the restaurant industry for about 15 years. 
The new course reflects changing trends in the industry, 
which adds about 9,000 fast-food restaurants nationally 
each year. 

Bork said that the fast-food industry is the third largest 
in America and in 1980 alone, sales totaled $9 billion. 
"We really need an education tool to teach up-and- 
coming fast-food managers," she said. 

"Presently, most of them (fast-food managers) are high 
school graduates that have worked their way up within 
the organization," Phillips said. "We are the first 
University to see this, a need (for formal education) and 
are endeavoring to do something about this." 

Although many of the students in the class are majors 
in hotel and restaurant management, it is also intended 
for other food-oriented majors such as dietetics, food- 
service administration, home economics in business and 
home economics education. 

Recently donated equipment has further added 
realism to the class, Alto Shamm, a Menomonee Falls 
manufacturer, provided $4,800 in kitchen equipment; 
the restaurant also received two electronic cash registers 
from Ondell Development of La Crosse. 

The operation has built-in competition from Corner 
III, another student-operated restaurant located in tire 
same building. That operation emphasizes cafeteria-style 
service during the noon hour. "I think that shows the 
students what competition can do to you," Phillips said. 



New programs offered by Stout 



Hospitality and Tourism 

A new graduate degree program at Stout will make 
a significant contribution to the development of the 
tourism industry, according to the program's director 
Jim Burke. 

The program, which leads to a master's degree in 
"Hospitality and Tourism," began accepting its first 
students last fall. Burke said only about 10 such 
programs are now available at colleges and universities 
in the United States. "In general, the opportunity for 
advanced degrees in this specialty area is very 
limited," he said. 

But Burke added that these kinds of degree pro- 
grams are needed to produce professionals who can 
aid the development and growth of the tourism in- 
dustry. "It's interesting that tire United States has 
more hospitality and tourism related facilities than 
most other nations," Burke said. "We produce a good 
share of the tourists of the world. Yet, in terms of 
sophistication and development of tourism, and the 
study of tourism as a field, we are basically way 
behind the rest of the world with the exception of 
some developing nations." 

Burke added that it is ironic that although 20 per- 
cent of all new jobs in recent years are related to 
tourism, public support of the industry has been slim. 
"Instead of being overwhelmed with support politi- 
cally and socially, we are ignored," Burke said about 
tourism. "We need folks out there who can tie the 
loose ends," 

Burke also said that there is a "real need for 
credible research" in the tourism industry. "Most of 
the people who have done research in tourism, un- 
fortunately, have had a vested interest in it," he said. 
"They are either trying to prove that something was 
effective or trying to prove that it was ineffective. 
Lack of legitimate and more objective research has 
been a real problem." 

Burke describes the graduate program by dividing 
it into three elements: "One is an overview of the 
industry, how the things fit together," he said. 
Students are also given research skills, enabling them 
to conduct reliable surveys and gather meaningful 
data. "The third thing is the opportunity (for students) 
to specialize in one area," Burke said. "They can 
pretty much create a specialty for themselves. The 
industry is broad enough." He said these specializa- 
tions will allow students to design individual study 
programs which will focus on future areas of employ- 
ment, Jobs might involve tourism agencies, lodging 
chains, universities, advertising and marketing firms, 
resorts, and visitor and convention bureaus." All of 
these areas have a need for "people who can operate 
effectively in the marketplace," according to Burke, 
"They are looking more and more for professionals," 



Burke said that the program will resist temptations 
for rapid growth by using selective admissions 
standards. "While the opportunity to expand is 
tempting and available, our program will emphasize 
quality, both in admission and preparation of stu- 
dents," he said. 

Persons interested in applying for admission to the 
program should write to Burke, in care of Stout's 
School of Home Economics. 

Food Technology 

A new minor, titled "food technology," is now being 
offered at Stout. 

Anita Wilson, administrator of Stout's department 
of food and nutrition, said that the minor is intended 
to prepare graduates for jobs in the nation's burgeon- 
ing food production industry. Wilson said the minor 
will serve as a companion to students enrolled in 
Stout's specialized ma- 
jors such as home eco- , j 
nomics, industrial tech- • -JiJ 
nology, business ad- 
ministration and applied 
mathematics. 

"It can combine the 
strengths of the School 
of Industry and Tech- 
nology, the sciences and 
liberal studies (of 
Stout's School of Liberal 
Studies) and the School 
of Home Economics," 
she said. 

Graduates of the 
minor will be able to 
work in areas such as 
food chemistry, quality Wllson •" lab 
control, product development and sales. "We feel that 
the placement of graduates should be excellent," 
Wilson said, "The food industry is a major part of 
the American industrial complex. There are those 
who feel that America's future really does lie in its 
ability as a food producing and food manufacturing 
nation." 

Wilson said another advantage of the minor is that 
it can lead to administrative careers with food com- 
panies. She said entry-level positions obtained by 
graduates of the minor "do lead up the corporate 
ladder into administration." 

"The minor also meets the basic requirements for 
a food technology major as established by the Institute 
of Food Technologists," she said. 

Additional information on the minor may be ob- 
tained from Stout's department of food and nutrition. 




Class Notes 



1910-1949 

GLADYS STBOBEL COCHRAN Dip. 
'10 is residing at 1225 Woodward Ave., 
Kingsford, Mich. 

RACHEL MCELDOWNEY 

GULLICKSON Dip. '12 has celebrated 
her 91st birthday. She resides at 358 N. 
Leonard St., West Salem, and wishes 
to hear from her classmates. 

ETHEL TILTON HALL Dip. 17 re- 
sides at 8555 S. Lewis Ave., Apt. 145, 
Tulsa Okla 

BEULAH STUBLEY SW ANSON Dip. 
'17 resides at 140 N. 8th, Pocatello, 
Idaho. 

HILMER OLSON Dip. '23, BS '30 
is retired and living at 1718 Chelsea 
Circle, Flint, Mich. 

SANFORD RUTLIN Dip. '24, BS '31 
was placed in the Flint school system 
by Stout's Placement office in 1924, 
where he taught industrial arts, and 
served as principal and assistant 
principal until his retirement in 1965. 

RUTH NEWBURY LATHROPE Dip. 
'25, BS '30 and her husband celebrated 
their golden wedding anniversary in 
June. They reside in Reedsburg. 

ALVA ADES ANGER '32 resides at 
Route 2, Wautoma, in the summer and 
Lockport, Texas, in the winter. 

WALTER JESKE '36 resides at 26962 
Franklin #223, Southfield, Mich. 

EARL E. LAATSCH '38 has at- 
tended elderhostels in Pennsylvania, 
Michigan, Kentucky, Minnesota and 
Wisconsin, and is enjoying retirement. 

VERNON FEILER '42 has retired and 
moved to Florida, where he plays bass 
horn in the Morocco Temple Shrine 
Band, is president of Kingdom of the 
Sun Chapter of the Retired Officers 
Association, and president of the Shady 
Road Ranches Community Association. 

SISTER GENEROSE GERVAIS '45 
has been installed as chairman of the 
board of trustees of the Catholic 
Health Association, Rochester, Minn. 

JACK BONGEY BS '49, MS '53 is a 
guidance counselor at Withrow High 
School, and is past president of the 
Greater Cincinnati Personnel and 
Guidance Association. 



1950-1969 

MILTON MILLER '50 is associate 
superintendent of finance and facility 
planning for Grand Rapids schools. 

CELIA FITZ LAUSTED '55 has re- 
ceived a certificate from Women 
Helping Women/Peer Counselor Train- 
ing Program at Stout. 

ELWOOD "WOODY" BILSE BS '56, 
MS '57 has been appointed acting sup- 
erintendent of the Fond du Lac School 
District. 

WESLEY FACE MS '56 was the re- 
cipient of the 1982 Distinguished 
Alumni Award from Northern State 
College, Aberdeen, S.D. 

CAROL BIBBY HJERLEID '59 is 
residing in Littleton, Colo. 

KEITH KOCH '60 was granted a 
patent for a folder unit that collates 
and wraps direct mail into poly mailing 
envelopes. 



RUTH KUNZ CONONE '63 is state 
program coordinator for Human Re- 
sources Cooperative Extension Service, 
Montana State University, ' Bozeman, 
Mont. 

"Speed" and SUE VASEY 
HALVORSON '64 reside in Inverness, 
Fla., where they own and operate the 
Family Tree Restaurant. 

JOAN HERWIG '65 has been given 
an Outstanding Teacher Award at Iowa 
State University. 

EDWARD GABRIELSE BS '66, MS 
'67 is a manager in instructional design 
and development for Arthur Anderson 
and Co., St. Charles, 111. 

ED BS '67, MS '70 and LYNN 
BEECHER TRAUTNER '67 reside in 
Appleton, where he is a graphic arts 
teacher at Madison Junior High School 
and she is an English teacher at 
Roosevelt Junior High School. 

ADONIS SEISER-MCLAIN '68 is 
an art instructor at Middleton High 
School and has been represented by 
galleries throughout Wisconsin, and in 
art shows in Wisconsin and Michigan. 

NANCY SAJNOG HORAN '68 is an 
analyst in the Data Systems Depart- 
ment, Wisconsin Telephone Co. 

WAYNE PETERS '69 is a realtor in 
Eau Claire and has presented programs 
for real estate education courses. 

RONALD '69 and CAROL 
KITZMANN TRIMBERGER '69 own 
and operate TrimB's Supper Club in 
Appleton, and he has been elected to the 
board of directors of the Wisconsin 
Restaurant Association. 

VIVIAN BUSH WILHELM MS '69 
has retired after 22 years in education 
and resides in Chippewa Falls. 

JOSETTE HOLT MARTINS MS '69 
is studying for the priesthood in the 
Episcopal Church and resides in Eden 
Prairie, Minn. 



1970-1972 

SUE BELL '70 is executive assistant 
and agent for an insurance agency in 
Wauwatosa. 

ALICE LANGHAM BS '70, MS '80 
is the Rusk County home economist 
and resides' in Ladysmith. 

ALBERT RICHARD BS '70, EDS '80 
has been appointed supervisor of busi- 
ness and marketing at WITI-Rice Lake 
Campus. 

DAN BA '71, MS '75 and DANIELLE 
KRASULA MENDINI '71 have two 
children and reside in Waunakee. 

COLLEEN FITZPATRICK 
SYLVESTER '71 is residing in Carmel, 
Ind. 

WILLIAM KLUG BS '71, MS '76 is 
teaching at State Technical Institute, 
Memphis, Tenn. 



The Stout Alumnus 

The Stout Alumnus is an official publica- 
tion of University of Wisconsin-Stout. It 
Is published quarterly by the Office of 
University Relations and is distributed to 
graduates, friends and faculty of the 
University. It is entered at the post office 
in Menomonie, Wis., as third class matter. 

John K. Enger Editor 

Carol Richard Ass't. to the Editor 

Mary Hintzman Class Notes 

Permission to reproduce articles from the 
Stout Alumnus is not required so long as 
acknowledgment Is given to this publica- 
tion. 



MICHAEL BS '72, MS '75, EDS '79 and 
COLLEEN HARTLE BARK '72 reside 
in Washburn, where he is an instructor/ 
supervisor at WITI-Ashland Campus 
and has been included in the 1982-83 
edition of "Who's Who in the Midwest." 

JIM BONINI '72 teaches industrial 
education at Milwaukee Washington 
High School and was elected vice presi- 
dent of the Wisconsin Industrial Edu- 
cation Association. 

MARYANN KOEPPELL ESPE '72 
received a master's in counseling 
from Mankato State and is a vocational 
counselor at the Austin Area Voca- 
tional-Technical Institute. 

JEFFREY KLAUSER '72 is an ac- 
count representative for Diamond 
Business Forms, Sheboygan. 

BETTY LEQUE '72 is program di- 
rector for Dairy Council of Wisconsin 
and resides in Milwaukee. 

KERM MORGAN MS '72 has been 
appointed to Congressman Dave Obey's 
7th District Citizens Advisory Com- 
mittee on Military Academy Appoint- 
ments. 

STEVEN PRAHL BS '72, MS '79 is 
a graphic arts teacher at Lakeland High 
School and attended the Advanced 
Teacher Institute in Pittsburgh. 

CHAR TERBEEST '72 is a home 
economics teacher at Baraboo and is a 
basket maker who has had successful 
showings at art fairs throughout 
Wisconsin. 



1973-1975 

JACALYN SCHULTZ BINDL '73 is a 

representative for Mary Kay Cosmetics. 

THOMAS ESSELSTROM '73 is a 
lead cast discipline engineer at Palo 
Verde Nuclear Generating Station, 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

REBECCA HAGEN BS '73, MS '82 
is an in-service instructor for home 
economics education at University of 
Minnesota-Duluth. 

TOM BS '73, MS '77, EDS '82 and 
LINDA JOCHIMSEN VANDERLOOP 
'72 reside in Menomonie where he is an 
instructor at Stout and she is a super- 
visor at Northwest Fabrics. 

The Rev. DANNY '73 and BRENDA 
JOHNSON WHEELER '73 reside at 
Camp Lejeune, N.C., where he is a 
chaplain with the U.S. Navy. 

DAVID LIEBERS '74 is an analyst 
in the Data Processing Department at 
State Farm Mutual Automobile 
Insurance Co., Bloomington, 111. 

KATHI LEMKE LODHOLZ ME '74 
is a school psychologist in the Crandon 
school system and has been elected 
president of the Wisconsin School 
Psychologists Association. 

WILLIAM ROWE '75 is operations 
manager and part owner of four Village 
Inn Pancake House restaurants. 

LINDSEY BOVINET '75 is president 
of an interior design and manufacturing 
firm, and resides in Fond du Lac with 
his wife and daughter. 

ROBERT LIETZ '75 has been ap- 
pointed vice president of Walt Peabody 
Advertising in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

NANCY HARRISON MCKAY '75 is 
Kewaunee County 4-H and youth 
agent. 

GAYLE NELSON OSTERHUS MS 
'75 was named Small-Business Person 
of the Year by the Greater Minneapolis 
Chamber of Commerce. 



9 



DAVID '75 and KATHY MONSON 

RANALLA '76 reside in Newhall, Calif. 
He is a design specialist for Cadam 
Inc. and she is a systems analyst at 
Lockheed Aircraft Corp. 



1976-1977 

GREG FISHER BS '76, MS '77 of 
Tomah and ANDY BEAR '78 of La 

Crosse have developed a new board 
game called "Purely Academic" that 
allows players to earn a college degree 
in one sitting. 

. MICHAEL RANDALL '76 has been 
appointed quality assurance supervisor 
at Appleton Papers Inc. 

MARY SAMPLE '76 is teaching art 
to mentally and physically disabled 
teenagers in Roseville, Minn. 

PEGGY JANES SEAMAN '76 has 
collaborated with her mother and pub- 
lished "The Janes Family Cookbook." 

MICHAEL SIEGMUND '76 is a 
statistical analyst for the engine 
division of the Kohler Co., Kohler. 

JEAN STEINKE BOETTCHER '77 is 
teaching at Mosinee High School and 
resides in Wausau. 

DIANE ROMNESS GAVIC '77 is 
associated with the Gavic Law office in 
the practice of law, Spring Valley. 

KIM JAQUISH '77 works in em- 
ployee relations for the Milwaukee 
Brewery. 

PAUL MESKE '77 is an audio/ 
television specialist for Moraine Park 
Technical Institute, Fond du Lac. 

HELEN BAETKE RIZZI MS '77 is 
teaching lipreading classes for District 
One Technical Institute and has re- 
ceived an award for her work with the 
deaf in District One. 

CINDY LADWIG WISE '77 is re- 
siding at 4845 S. 69th St., Milwaukee. 



1978-1979 

KEITH BRADEN '78 is a pastry chef 
for Pagliaccis Restaurant, La Crosse. 

ROBERT BTJSCH MS '78 has been 
included in the 1982-83 edition of 
"Who's Who in the Midwest." 

JIM '78 and SUE LELLI GEHRIG '77 
reside in La Crosse, where he is a 
manufacturing engineer for Trane and 
she is a clinical dietitian at St. Francis 
Medical Center. 

GORDON HAGGERTY BS '78, MS 
'82 is an electronics instructor at North 
Central Technical Institute, Wausau. 

DIANE HEINICHEN VOSS '78 is 
residing at 421 Seventh Ave. S.E., 
Oelwein, Iowa. 

DANIEL '78 and PEGGY NORDGREN 
'77 reside in Medford and she is the 
Taylor County extension home 
economist. 

BILL WEISS MS '78 is coordinator 
for the mass communication services at 
UW-Whitewater. 

RICHARD CHRISTENSEN '79 is a 
customer service representative for 
McGill/Jensen Inc., St. Paul, Minn. 

WAYNE KELM BS '79, MS "'82 is an 
instructor at NWTI-Green Bay. 

LYDIA TOOKER MIDNESS '79 has 
been awarded the Candle Fellowship 



by Phi Upsilon Omicron, National 
Honor Society in Home Economics. 

RICHARD WHITEBIRD '79 is resid- 
ing at 804 Prospect Ave., Wausau. 

FEDERICO ZARAGOZA MS '79 was 
appointed head of the Governor's 
Employment and Training office in 
Wisconsin. 



1980-1982 

DARYL '80 and PAMELA WENDT 
MUELLER '78 reside in Minneapolis 
where he is a production planner for 
the Webb Co. 

CAROL TOLLEFSON '80 is teaching 
marketing and distributive education at 
Beaver Dam Senior High School. 

SARA WUEST BS '80, MS '82 is a 
child protection worker/women's ad- 
vocate for Brown County Family 
Service, New Ulm, Minn. 

CHRIS BRACKEN '81 is convention 
manager for the Marina del Rey 
Marriott in California. 

CARLA HALBUR '81 is catering di- 
rector for the Holiday Inn-Milwaukee 
West. 

PATTI HOVLAND '81 is a mer- 
chandising assistant for J. C. Penney, 
Houston. 

GAYLE JONAS '81 is the area man- 
ager in the men's department at H.C. 
Pranges, Madison. 

DAN SILER BA '81, MS '82 is a resi- 
dence hall director at UW-La Crosse. 

PAUL THEISEN '81 is a plant engi- 
neer for Mirro Corp. 

ROBERTA ALGER '82 is an assistant 
manager for El Chico Corp., Dallas. 

LISA ANDERSON '82 is a home 
economics teacher for Newcomb High 
School, Newcomb, N.M. 

ROBERT BAJCZYK '82 is a pro- 
grammer for Etched Circuits Inc., 
Cherry Hill, N.J. 

MICHAEL CLEMENS '82 is a senior 
engineer technician for an electronics 
company and resides in Lodi. 

RAY DRAXLER MS '82 is teaching 
junior high school social studies and is 
a part-time elementary counselor at 
Frederic. 

ANDREW FENNEMA III '82 is a 
test driver for American Motors Corp., 
Kenosha. 

PAUL GILBERTSON '82 is the dis- 
tributive education teacher for Ashland 
High School. 

DAVID HOBAN ME '82 has been 
named administrator of Serenity House 
Group Home, Eau Claire. 

PHYLLIS KOEHLER '82 is with the 
Peace Corps in Tanzania, Africa. 

BRADLEY LEWIS '82 is teaching 
power mechanics and electricity at 
Sheboygan Falls High School. 

TONY L1BERKO '82 is a process 
engineer for Hutchinson Technology 
Inc., Hutchinson, Minn. 

DONNA MORK '82 is a teacher for 
Kinder-Care, Stillwater, Minn. 

MARK OVERGARD '82 is the man- 
ager for Color Tile of Joplin, Mo. 

LISA STONE '82 is a home economics 
teacher for grades 8-12 in Bruce. 

BETH ULRICH '82 is a manager for 
Bowen Shoe Co., Houston. 



CAROL VIEREGGE '82 is a sales 
agent for the Combined Insurance 
Company of America. 

TAMMY GRANDT '82 is a home 
economics teacher in the Middleton 
Cross Plains School District. 



Marriages 



1969-1977 

Leanne Chapman to HERB 
SOLINSKY '69, Oct. 9, Woodruff. 
Couple resides in Miami. 

Denise Bussman to ROBERT WELLS 
'71, Oct. 16, Kenosha, where couple 
resides. 

MARILYN KRAUSE '74 to Richard 
Leccese, Sept. 18, Kenosha, where 
couple resides. 

ANNETTE JASPER '74 to John 
Taylor, July 24, Menomonie, where 
couple resides. 

Jodean Swatzina to MICHAEL 
RAVEN '74, April 17, Chippewa Falls. 
Couple resides in Marshfield. 

JOANNE HOLEWINSKI '76 to James 
Lantz, Oct. 30, Neenah, where couple 
resides. 

Shelly Eparvier to RICHARD WETLI 
'77, Sept. 11, Oconto. Couple resides in 
Green Bay. 

DORI GAFFANEY '77 to Timothy 
Bader, Sept. 4, Green Bay. CoUple re- 
sides in Valentine, Neb. 

CHERYL MEYER BS '77, MS '82 to 
Gary Bork, Jan. 2, Menomonie, where 
couple resides. 



1978-1979 

KATHRYN BEIER '78 to THOMAS 

MARZAHL '78, Oct. 22, Kaukauna. 
Couple resides in New Holstein. 
DEBRA BURGHARDT '78 to KERRY 

STAEHLER '79, July 17, Bloomer. 
Couple resides in Wittenberg. 

Pam Caswell to STEVE 
YOUNGBAUER '78, Sept. 25, Stanley. 
Couple resides in Milwaukee. 

JENNIFER CLEMENS '78 to Robert 
London, March 5, Sardinia, Italy. 
Couple resides in Honolulu, Hawaii. 

DEBRA CONKLIN '78 to William 
Hoyt, Aug. 21. Couple resides in 
Milwaukee. 

JEAN CROWNHART '78 to Richard 
Zeithaml, Oct. 2. Couple resides in 
Akron, Ohio. 

CAROL FREDERICK '78 to Mick 
Kalinowski, June 25. Couple resides in 
Bagley. 

VICKI KEITH '78 to James 
Steinhardt, Sept. 25, Sheboygan. Couple 
resides in Plymouth. 

DIANE SCHOTT '78 to John Rasch, 
Aug. 14, Madison, where couple resides. 

JANA NELSON '79 to DENNIS 
NELSON '76, June 5. Couple resides 
in Wisconsin Rapids. 

LYNNE SUNDBERG MS '79 to 
Kenneth Nimmer, July 31, Eagle River. 
Couple resides in Green Bay. 



10 



Linda Williams to WILLIAM 
GALLAGHER '79, Oct. 30. Couple re- 
sides in Grand Rapids, Mich. 

LINDA KARL '79 to Al Aslakson, 
July 17. Couple resides in New Glarus. 

1980 

CATHERINE BELONGEA to GARY 
WERELEY, Sept. 5, New Berlin. 
Couple resides in Chicago. 

Deborah Breier to RICK 
TEEGARDEN, Oct. 9, Knapp. Couple 
resides in Green Bay. 

PATRICIA CONWAY to ROGER 
KARNOPP, Sept. 25. Couple resides in 
Eagan, Minn. ' 

AMY GIBLER to WILLIAM 
JOHNSON '81, Sept. 18, Rockford, 111. 
Couple resides in Shorewood. 

JONI HANSEN to William Mooney, 
Aug. 7, Little Falls, Minn., where 
couple resides. 

Tammy Knoll to JEFFREY WILKINS. 
Couple resides in Brainerd, Minn. 

Deborah Peck to MARK MILLER, 
Nov. 13, Waukesha. Couple resides in 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Janet Sterzinger to JOHN "JACK" 
APFEL MS, Sept. 18, Colby. Couple 
resides in Marshfield. 

Barbara Zeise to MICHAEL WEAS, 
Aug. 28, Green Bay. Couple resides in 
Winnipeg, Canada. 

1981 

PEGGY BARLOW to John Annis, 
Oct. 1, Appleton. Couple resides in 
Plymouth . 

MARY BASIL to BRAD CUMMINGS 
'80, Aug. 7. Couple resides in Powell, 
Wyo. 

KELLY BOHLAND to James 
Anderson, April 3, Viroq.ua. Couple re- 
sides in Homewood, Ala. 

Jo Anne Debbink to DENNIS 
NIPPLE, Sept. 25, Sheboygan Falls. 
Couple resides in Marinette. 

BETH DILLINGHAM to RICK 
KATHAN '82, Minneapolis. Couple re- 
sides in Racine. 

CAROL FREDRICKSON to MARK 
THOMPSON '82, Aug. 7, Benson, Minn. 
Couple resides in Stratford. 

KRIS LA BEREE to GARY 
ANDRESS '78, Nov. 6, Menomonie. 
Couple resides in Apple Valley, Minn. 

ELAINE PIAS to Larry Biehn, Dec. 
4, Paris. Couple resides in Somers. 

Laura Prod to MICHAEL BOOHER, 
Nov. 6, West Allis. Couple resides in 
Waukesha. 

Renee Trainor to BRIAN PRISSEL, 
Oct. 16, Durand. 

CINDY TRYCZAK to RANDAL 
MATHWICK '78, Oct. 16, Wausau. 

Donna Whinnery to CHARLES 
HYINK, Sept. 25, Wauwatosa. Couple 
resides in St. Paul, Minn. 

Lisbeth Wiesner to KEITH 
BILODEAU, Aug. 21, Barron. Couple 
resides in Portland, Ore. 

1982 

JO ANN CLEMENT to PETER 

MALM '80, Aug. 7, Delavan. Couple 
resides in Naperville, 111. 

CAROLINE DAHL to Bradley 
Qualey, Hudson. Couple resides in 
Minneapolis. 



TAMERA DUCKLOW to John Olson, 
June 5. Couple resides in Chippewa 
Falls. 

RENEE GENETT to TIMOTHY WILD 

'81, Sept. 3, Brookfield. Couple resides 
in St. Louis Park, Minn. 

BETH GIBSON to KENT 
SCHOENHERR '80, Aug. 21. Couple 
resides in Grafton. 

Susan Heppner to JOHN VREELAND, 
Sept. 11, Stratford. Couple resides in 
Stevens Point. 

Julie Lammer to STEVEN 
OBERMUELLER, Oct. 9, Menomonie. 
Couple resides in Elk Mound. 

Maureen Paulik to JAMES REINKE, 
Oct. 9, Oshkosh. Couple resides in 
Spooner. 

LEANNE PETERSON to Ralph 
Herrmann, Sept. 25, Muskego. Couple 
resides in Appleton. 

PENNY RADLOFF to Jerry 
Hilgendorf, Aug. 21, Lake Mills. Couple 
resides in Menomonie. 

JODI RESCIGNO MS to MARK 
HOFFMAN '81, Aug. 7, West Bend. 
Couple resides in Appleton. 

Alison Schmuki to JOHN SAZAMA, 
Oct. 16, Genesee Depot. Couple resides 
in Chippewa Falls. 

VIRGINIA SCHUNING to DAVID 
KOPYDLOWSKI '74, Oct. 2, De Pere. 
Couple resides in Fort Payne, Ala. 



Births 



1970-1974 

A daughter, Emily Louise, July 17, 
to FRANK '70 and SUSAN PETERSON 
SINGER '71, Kenosha. 

A son, Matthew David, Sept. 28, to 
Ronald and NANCY WERNER YOU 
'70, Appleton. 

Identical twin girls, Amy Lynn and 
Anne Marie, Feb. 3, to ROSCOE '71 
and Jane BUTTERFIELD. 

A daughter, Colleen Anne, Nov. 11, 
to Larry and MAUREEN HANRAHAN 
SHERKOW '71, West Bend. 

A daughter, Allison, to JIM '72 and 
Faye BONINI, Menomonee Falls. 

A son, Anthony Joseph, Nov. 5, to 
TOM '72 and JOANNE CARINI 
HAGMANN '73, St. Cloud, Minn. 

A son, Brian Rex, Aug. 14, to REX 
'72 and KAREN FABRITZ KODERL 
'70, Madison. 

A son, William Petrie, Dec. 2, to 
STEVEN '72 and Joyce Piersall 
SCHWARZ, Livonia Center, N.Y. 

A daughter, Rachel Elizabeth, June 
29, to Gary and JANE KOCHNOWICZ 
BRANTMIER '73, Oshkosh. 

A daughter, Lana Jean, Aug 18, to 
FRANK '73 and MARIE SALO FRYER 
'73. 

A son, Andrew Ryan, Feb. 13, 1982, 
to Dan and CAROL ANDREW HUCK 
'73, Eldorado. 

A daughter, Mollie Elizabeth, Oct. 24, 
to HUGH '74 and Marcia CRANE, 
Chippewa Falls. 

Twin boys, Christopher and Mark, 
Sept. 10, to TONY '74 and PAT DANCA 
GILEWSKI '74, Stillwater, Minn. 

A daughter, Katie, June 7, to Frank 
and PEG PARLIN IMHOLTE '74, 
'Kimball, Minn. 



1975-1982 

A son, Jacob, Dec. 20, to . JON 
SCHOENBORN '75, Springfield, Mo. 

A son, Lawrence Martin, Nov. 1, to 
Lawrence and DEANNA DEREMER 
HANSON '75, Austin, Minn. 

A daughter, Jaclyn Shawn, Sept. 
30, to KEN '75 and Roberta 
OBERMUELLER, River Falls. 

A son, Jeremy Daniel, Oct. 26, to 
GENE '75 and Candyce O'CONNELL, 
Milwaukee. 

A son, Christopher Thomas, Nov. 4, 
to DAVID '75 and KATHY MONSON 
RANALLA '76, Newhall, Calif. 

A son, Eric Matthew, Aug, 14, to 
Terry and PATRICIA SHOLD 
BOMKAMP '76, Muncie, Ind. 

A son, Christopher William, Oct. 22, 
to GREG '76 and KAREN SCHARL 
CICHON '77, Madison. 

A son, Jared, Nov. 16, to DAVE '76 
and CHRIS REDLICH NOLAN '76, St. 
Louis. 

A son, Matthew, Sept. 1, to Todd 
and ANN SCHLINSOG THIES '76, 
Boyceville. 

A son, William Ernest, Sept. 5, to 
LARRY '77 and JENNIFER BEYER 
HUBER '78, Appleton. 

A son, Sept. 7, to James and 
CATHERINE SCHMIDT JAMBOLS 
'77, Onalaska. 

A daughter, Anne, to JULIE 
FISCHER OLSON '77, Minnetonka, 
Minn. 

A son, William Joseph, to WILLIAM 
'77 and Mary SCHUH, Little Chute. 

A son, Erich Michael, Dec. 6, to 
MICHAEL '78 and JILL RAND BUSS 
'77, River Falls. 

A son, Chad Joseph, Nov. 22, to 
Lance and MARY INGMAN HERMAN 
'78, Tomahawk. 

A daughter, Elizabeth Jean, March 
10, 1981, to David and MARTHA SIEFF 
AAS '79, Minneapolis. 

A son, July 23, to Gary and TRACE V 
SCHOTANUS REIMERS '8 0, 
Grayslake, 111. 

A son, Richard Lee, May 6, to 
CHRISTOPHER '82 and Catherine 
CASE, Spring Valley. 



Deaths 



1910-1934 

NETTIE CAROLINE "AUNT 
CHICK" WILLIAMS MCBIRNEY Dip. 
'10, 96, Dec. 16, Tulsa, Okla. 

WILLIAM HAMILTON Dip. '16, BS 
'27, 91, Durand. 

LESTER KOPP Dip. '23, April, Eau 
Claire. 

WALTER SPEERSTRA Dip. '28, BS 
'33 , 74, Dec. 17, Tomah. 

JOHN MEDLA '34, 71, Dec. 15, 
Cudahy. 



Benita G. Smith, a Stout child 
development teacher who retired in 
1968 to Marion, Iowa, died Dec. 25. 



11 



People You Know 





. Daines ■ ■ "'Cabot, , .■ 

..; At / the; -^nhrial; StoutrAlumni ; Asser/ 
':. oiatibn/ board; of .director's meeting, 

Jeanette Dailies BS ..'.74, MS '77 was 
^elected; / '/president: \;bf/ :,;the j/'^oard;;/ 

Maggie . Foote '74, vice,, president; 

and Scott Cabot BS '78, MS '79, 
: ';^secr6ta]^.^fepasur^r/';'^Niewly^ v el0ptV4< 

meriilpers to tnev board inelude^^ Mark 

Baker '77, Eau Claire; Rich Dirks 
:i:BSS'6^rM& :'7l,,:Eau Claire; 1 Roger . 
:: Sabota : ,'64,; .Rhineiander.jV- andv'Aiin 1 : 
^YurcisinMS'^;EDS'81,,Menbmonie.; : ; 
-Continuing, onv;Va'S".'rAembers~:.bf-;'.ih'e\ 

board are: Sue Foxwell MS '78; 

Scott Larkin '79; Robert Martin BS 

'71, MS '77, EDS '82; Bev Spinti BS 

'54, MS '76; Marian Timmerman '68; 

Steve VandeBerg MS '75; and Lloyd 

Whydotski '41. The association has 
: \^pre'Hfeii,C2bj0d6\alumin^-:..mernbersV 
' and ' has :. been, -instrumental fin, pro- : : 
/yijdirig v/regibnal ; ; get^tpgethers ; for v 
.!■; alumni, 'publishes ; a /quarterly hvaga-/ 

zine, : and /aids' alumni' /with/ "adr' : 
, dresses of ; other, 1 , Stout graduates. \ 

The : Alumni "Association's board, of , 

directors |,. works ■:;;^ttri , .;.'the^^aluimhi;'.; 
.'director \. to / program} homecoming 
/activities, "golden anniversary; •; eyents / 
"for the 50-year and 60-year ?gradui:j 
'. ates^'aud^represents Stout /at alumni ; 
,;;functipns£-'if,; l ft:^.''i 7 'ifi.i^'^'HfO — ■■;'*'■';' 

'S The,, next Alumni College /will fee 
;4ield : : July;s28-31,; ; ''Tlechnplpgy /and: .. 

American .Life" is the event's therne. ' 

Alumhi,; familyand: friends are wel- 
■ .come. '{ v; The! : 7 College i ; wall : '/ 7f eature 

'Uniyersj,ty faculty : and - aluniniy f or. ; . 

three, days of ;Cpurses,:,and the. added ;■ 
/-attraction;: of > Tthe /- 7' Alumni;; j Golf :;' 

Toiirnament, ' . Saturday,; ., July ; . 30.;; 

Adrian Dorsch '42, a financial 
•: 'analyst,/ ^t,willi\:';present V.\ ,; !'Wipning;'- ; , 
/Strategies: /Tfbr -'/a 'Secure '■[ /Future:" 

Deanna Howell House '61, a home 

economist/, and 7;; publisher: ,,/bf 7;;the7' 



.recipe book, "House Specials,'' '.will 
make; quick,/. ; easy; ; 'nutrition meals ';-. 

/ in the //micro waye. '.', 7 And,. Marcelle 
;Straatrnari;,M3,;'hurnan Jdeveloprxient - 

7 specialist, :, Oregon State. '.Uhiyersity,; 
Extension;; Service,: ";and 'phe. 'pf ; the ": 
1982 ; .Distinguished; Alun^ni ,; Award ; 

; /winners,// will. give, a "feurrhbuV; prpi?' 

/ grarh-oh:; : ' ! :Transitiphs.'' : ;B6b ^ Meirbse,-,; 

"Stout -/'-.faculty;.^ 

" completed;; a;/ trip to China; 'and/vnill/ : 

/speak oh;TOe 1 ;topic,;:"China^;Pplitics,v' 

, Histpryarid Culture^": ^Ariita-^lsciji,';-;. 

.prpfesspiV'ahdviadMinistrator; of. food, 7 

;■ and ^hutritioh,;',, will 7 explain;/:: today's 7: 
food techhplpgy; in her .presentation.;; 
"Tomato; ..Chips ;tp^.:C'prripute.r;iChips;' .^ 
Gordon Jones, professor and direc-.'.. 

./tor of ;.. : the'/;;Academ^^ 
Services, 'Will/ updatfepne's'/sboni- / 
puter/ .'./edti;cati<ih.K 
.Joseph, :/hpted;/futurist;y^ 
key note • speaker. ..Children: 'will ;haV:e7; 
,a separate program; of •leisure-time ';; 

^sriortsy/DoBniitory/orppms; /are: avails ' 
able. and, pamping; f aciUties'are / coh-r : 

:venient.;;;5;Brice';/;of;/.;;the : ;:' College //Is ;/ 
$100 per /person for .Collbge-paiticir'.; 
-pants ,ancl:;$4o fpr,; children attending;;:: 

/the: leisure/ prpgraih/ .(Note; Thb '$100, .':' 
includes :7all /ineals/,; instruction- /ahd.: : 

"Social .activities.); Dormitory /hbus^ i; 
ing : .M; iyajlable/ifor; /all,three nights/; 

//at 7 a /cost "'.:■ of ;,/$30/sirigle / "room; '//pr//. 

-. $40/dbtible; ioprnv; ;/../";{" :i)^ '-'/////v./' '"//"/w./': 

:y;;;Keepjng5;up /;;witfc 

proves : /an impossible 'task/ Please 7" 

'.''help., -lis put //as we /list //the; .■ ,VjtnissInji£V.'': 

.■ , .'ih■''';■;■each;.^,quar^l^■-: ; pu^licati6n^iA■:' ; '' 
Maxine Elaine Altficld '72, Mac 
Lawson Amadi '79, Mrs. John 
Ambroso '65, Mohammad E, Amidi 
'78, John Amos '24, Chester 
Amundson '22, Florence Amundson 
'16, Gunv.or Amundson '22, Lily G. 




phonathon volunteers 



Amundson '36 and Lorraine 
Amundson '40. If you have an 

' address;: : " please v/' : call .'/the:"/ Alumni 7/ : 7 
,;'office};;(7i5);;2^ji51y;;. : ;v^>/>:;'v,;:;/:.;y;;;.;:.'.;: 

Alumni Director , Pat Beisinger 
Vsaid, /ihat;;, the /'phohathph, //Stout's,; ;; 
: ,/Iirst, has. beeh: -'a /"super success" ,■ as ■;-.' 
:.; 'a //new • Alumni/; project;.' and/fof }the;/;/: 

/ number /.of /pledges /from/ the, com-," : 
Opleted/cails;/ ^ A/'/tetal/ of ;3,729: .calls;/;/: 
^ :wer:e:made/ah(l:Stout Alumni came// ;/ 
/' thrpugjh ^:;;::withV25ypercerit;;:/bf ^:the // 
:.. graduates pledging a , total bf $22,775, / 

About 92 percent were new donors. 
//Pledges^rahged ;;f rom ' ;$5 /So: /$l;0b0.:;: > 
;-/ Average;/ was ;4$24:60.,:iTh^ //monies;;'// 
,. will/b^e ;uSed ^^ 
/.of //^student -;./s^^ 

;;:/g^ahlsKto;;/the/rifaculty.;: Phpnathpn'V/ 
■} \ volunteers ;y/ill;.be:;caning ^gaih/ther/,;: 

first two weeks in April to make 
Vz;Mz//gpal^ 

* 'goes out to "the staff of the Library 
/'Le'arhing-CehteiS/where phohe.facili-::;/- 
:';lies,were.made^availabfe"'/:" :/:"'//;;/ T ; / 
Rosalie Powell BS '69, MS '74, 
/; extension;^ 

/vijheslDistmgilished //.Service s Awa?d : 
//frprn;;;ithe:i:Watiphal//Asspeiati6h^ 
.;; Eiten'sioh/jIpiA^ 

Dennis Harms '65, Chugiak, 
:;vMaska,//:is;:;lhe //holder /;bf, the:;:1982;y^ 
::Spari:;;..Club;y 

}/fbr'::"largest//hiimbef/ black^/?/;: 

/'t;aildeer'':^hbt;this:year. :■■'.' ;yi"// :/, V; ■ '■■'■ 

Gerald Nestel '62, Sartell, Minn., 
vahdvf aculty.;;./member: ; at ./St.; /Cloud : : :/;; 
; / ' State /.p'niyersi^^lll'repr^se^t'.Stbiit/';,..': 

at the inauguration of Brenda J. 
/McDonald, " T7th«/:presideht : ^ of >. St.' ::;/; 
':, Cloud: /State -ITmyersit^; $eb: u 2&d?. :;v ; :/ 

Jean Carlson '44 has been ap- 
: /^oihted:/ , :tb; ; :;the:,;;:TOscbhs 
/ ; rnent' /j/bf ..JPuhlic'/j Instr^ictibri '■. „-;Ad^;J/ •: ■■"', 

visory Council for Food and Nutri- 
, tion by State Superintendent Harry 

Grover. 

Faye Lumsden Scheil '72 is cur- 
rently director of .Financial Aid, '' 
/ tfniyersity //sof/'/Dyibuque,: ^Pubuque;" V 
/;jowai':::ahdi:!:as ;^f/:Ji4y/;i,*prssideiit;:/';:;; : 

of , the Iowa Association of Student ' 

Financial Aid Administrators 

(IASFAA). ' ' 

Robert Dahlke BS '58, MS '69, MS 
; ;'78,./ director /of jPlacernpht/atjSfp'U^/::;:/; 
/hosted i : .:.art^^^ 

.}Bb§tphi/;;Feb;:'/8;:at^lhe^her^pn;/^ 
;-.;"viC.;;'.'j;^pritinuea.;^ 



Schplarships: have .beeh./established 
/for four 'friends /of Stout ; who / each 

'':die.d''recently,.;:;: :< .:.//."';.y :; vv/i/V^.":;'-/ v 
Evalyn Van Stratum Brixikman, a 

.1916 graduate, taught with her hus-: 
band /Walter '15 : for many years in : 
the.: Chicago /area. After, attending 
Stout, Evalyn did graduate work/at 
the University of Chicago, earning 
the Coveted Phi,' Beta /Kappa key,' 
Walter Brinkman : died in 1951. In 
addition, to her prof essional interests, 
and up; to 'her death in /Octpber. of 
1982, Evalyn's rnany avocations in- 
cluded, painting, designing for her 
husband's/ projects and jewelry 
making. Through her will, Evalyn 

/established the Evalyn Van Stratum 
and ; Walter Brinkman Scholarship 
Fund- to aid deserving students at. 
Stout. -' ,: ■'' 

Mae Lampert was a Stout graduate 
of 1920. She spent her life in the 



In memorium 

' Minneapolis rSt. ' P apl .. /area:/ and' - in,/ 
Hollywood, Calif.,' , /where; -/she / was : 
.ipyolvedvin'landVdeveloprAeht. /She:; 
traveled . extensively arid never failed/ 
to accord /StbUt : the / ; credit.- for /the/ 
''excellen^:';''«d,Uqatiph^l-/prp^arh'''Xsh.ey! 
; had received.: Beginning ■/rn:pre-;iJia»':: 
;;15 : years ^^, /before/ v : .h0r. : ;\;deatri''''-iri: 1 
/ Noveihber '■ of , 1982; she began'making 
/regular /gifts / tb / establish the Mae ; 
Lampert Scholarship Fund, which 
has ■ been , awarding as /many , as 50 
. scholarships per; ; year , to / Stout 
/students.'"//'- /'/M'/. ; ' 

Reinhold E. Dahlgren attended 
Stout .before World War I and came , 
back to complete his bachelor's 
degree in 1926. With .his wife 
Borghild, a Menompnie native -and 
also a Stout graduate, he taught 
industrial education in Detroit. 
After retirement, he and Borghild 
returned to his home of Fergus 



;*Fails,^T/iiriri. /,/in /honpf / : ;pf;/Horghildf;;: 
- upbn/yherl^death /in;: 1975;/ Reinhold ;// 
. estahiishe.d/the'/R 
//Bbrghildy/Eng/Daiilgren/Sclielars^ 
./Fund ;tp help.' deserving Stout .stu- ' 
. /.dents: uwith/^ 3heir ; education;- /Upon -'. 
'his death/in November of 1982, he ./ 
/left his entire /estate to this; scholar-// . 
./ship"furid.;'/,/-/>: v...V;.v'/v' : :;C -.^/'^''^yi -.;.'/"/ 
Ray Wigen, dean of Graduate 
.Studies/at Stout, .(lied; in December.; /. 
-Wigen -Hall, a- .residence /hall, on the / 
north campus, is named in his honor. 
vHe, joined/ the; Stout/staff in v l?33 /;/ 
and made many/important contribu- 
tions to , the Uriiyersity/and to the;; 
field of ipdustrial , education. /In his 
honor, '/the.'/ Ray.., Wigeri; Graduate ; 
Scholarship ■ Fund / has : : been, estab- 
lished. Contributions-can be sent, to 
the Stout , University Foundation 
Inc., in ; care ,, of the University. ... 



People You Know 



(Continued from page 11) 

Robert K. Smith MS '70, a faculty 
member at Bemidji, was the Stout 
delegate to the inauguration of 
Lowell R. Gillett, sixth president, 
Bemidji State University on Feb. 12. 

Jeff Daniels '80 and Pete Bercnds 
'82, San Jose, Calif., coordinated the 
February Alumni Get-Together 
when Chancellor Swanson was in 
attendance and presented a program 
on "Stout Into the 20th Century." 

Jerry Haugh '65 was selected for 
a $1,000 grant award from the 
Society of Plastic Engineers for the 
outstanding high school plastics 
program in the United States. Jerry 
is an industrial education teacher 
at Memorial High, Madison. 

Dewey Barich '33 was the chair- 
man of the Tucson, Ariz., Alumni 
Chapter Get-Together, Feb. 19 at 
the Doubletree Hotel. 

Sue Banovich Oxendoif '68 was 
chairwoman of the Clearwater, Fla., 
Alumni Gathering, Feb. 18 at the 
Caribbean Gulf Resort Hotel. She 
Worked with Rich Sprccher '80, 
beverage manager at the hotel. John 
Furlong was host to the Florida 
graduates. 

Bill Rosandick '79, a Peace Corps 
volunteer, is serving in Tumauini, 
Province of Isabella, Philippines. He 
is a health, sanitation and nutrition 



aide, and is organizing health com- 
mittees in the Tumauini area. He is 
learning three of the 80 dialects 
common in the Philippines'. 

Sarah Reynolds '80 is enrolled in 
the basic training course with 
Madeleine Kamman, professeur de 
Cuisine in Annecy, France, and 
looking forward to news from class- 
mates. Her address is: c/o Lajonc, 13 
bis rue de Novel, 74000 Annecy, 
France. 

And, are you missing a class ring? 
A Fairbanks, Alaska, resident sent 
a Stout class ring to the Alumni 
office hoping we could send it to its 
owner. He found it as he was 
digging up a culvert. Any help 
would be appreciated. 

The Alumni office heard from 
Kathryn Krause Plansky '39. She 
mentions that three of her five 
children are graduates of Stout: 
John '77, Mary '78 and Joan '79. 

The Alumni office is planning a 
Hawaiian Alumni Get-Together in 
March of 1984. Pat Reisinger, 
alumni director, would like to take 
a stateside tour group to join with 
the Hawaii alumni for a reunion of 
graduates, friends and faculty. Stay 
tuned for a detailed program in the 
summer alumnus. Other alumni dates 
are April 4 through 14 — -Alumni 
Phonathon; June 17 — Golden An- 
niversary Reunion; July 28 through 
30 — Alumni College; Oct. 22 — 
Homecoming Weekend. 

Emma Nasgowitz Madden '28 has 
recently moved to Shell Lake. Her 
favorite past time is oil painting. 



She took first place at an art show 
with over 200 entries. She would 
love to hear from any of her friends 
at Evergreen Apt. #102, Shell Lake, 
Wis. 54871. 

Dave Barnard, Stout's dean for 
Learning Resources, reminds every- 
one that the 18th annual Media 
Technology Conference will be held 
July 18-20 in Menomonie. Among 
the headliners will be Dan H. Fenn 
Jr., director of the John F. Kennedy 
Presidential Library. A variety of 
other speakers and workshops will 
be presented: Write to Dave for 
details. 

Former Blue Devil stars of the past 
returned to the Stout Campus re- ' 
cently to participate in an alumni 
basketball contest. Present at the 
game were Dave Reisinger, 
Menomonie; Joe Jax, former Blue 
Devil assistant basketball coach, 
Menomonie; Norm "Tom" Olson, 
Waconia, Minn.; Ron Fox, 
Menomonie; Mark Lofthus, Colfax; 
Dan Hopfensperger, Sun Prairie; 
Bill Buechner, Sturgeon Bay; Bruce 
Mueller, Madison; Mike Barnes, 
Milwaukee; Rick Nolan, Menomonie; 
Jeff Cleveland, Minnetonka, Minn.; 
Larry Madson, Neenah; Kent Stelter, 
Fall Creek; Chuck Schaaf, Chetek; 
Ed Andrist, Stanley; Ken 
Obermueller, River Falls; Paul 
Radke, Appleton; Craig Summers, 
Paris, Ky.; Jack Capelle, Wisconsin 
Dells; Harvey Pearson, Milwaukee; 
Mel Coleman, Minneapolis; Steve 
Zinyewski, Houston, Minn.; and 
Gary Lueke, La Crosse. 



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1983